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First Data On New Dental Fillings To Repair Tooth Decay Revealed

 

 

This might be a shock, but its true: data indicates that over 80 percent of the population in the United Kingdom has at least one filling in their teeth, seven fillings being the average. In addition to this, dentists fill eight million cavities with amalgams each year.

 

There are many mercury-based amalgams, but thanks to new data released by Professor Robert Hill, this may not need to be the case much longer. This data, regarding new bioactive glass composites, indicates a prolonged composite life and a lessened need for amalgams with mercury. This is major progress in restorative materials for everyone’s teeth.

 

The bioactive glass composites, according to Professor Hill, possess a unique ability to release fluoride. Fluoride, as you know, is an essential component in oral health. It is a mineral often found in soil, water, and some food. It improves teeth’s resistance to decay, and may even reverse tooth decay that has already started. The bioactive composites can also release high quantities of phosphate and calcium, two other elements needed to form strong tooth mineral.

 

The bioactive glass composites, according to Professor Hill, possess a unique ability to release fluoride. Fluoride, as you know, is an essential component in oral health. It is a mineral often found in soil, water, and some food. It improves teeth’s resistance to decay, and may even reverse tooth decay that has already started. The bioactive composites can also release high quantities of phosphate and calcium, two other elements needed to form strong tooth mineral.

 

The benefits of the new bioactive glass composite have caught the attention of the dental community. It is definitely clear these fillings can provide significant improvements in oral health when patients require dental fillings. BioMin Technologies has even licensed the technology of the bioactive glass and hopes to find a use for the remineralizing in dental products with restorative properties.

 

In recent developments in the dental industry, there is significant pressure to reduce and hopefully eliminate the use of amalgams with mercury by the year 2020. In fact, Richard Whatley, who happens to be the CEO of BioMin Technologies, indicates this is actually included in a number of international agreements. The good news is this new bioactive glass composite is a great help in the reduction of mercury-based amalgams. The fillings, as described previously, do not simply put teeth into stasis. They actually help to reverse the effects of tooth decay and return your teeth to their optimum health.

 

These new dental fillings, along with proper oral hygiene practices like regular brushing (twice a day) and flossing (most recommend once a day, or at least with meals where food often gets caught in your teeth), are sure to help the overall oral health of everyone, particularly with the scourge of tooth decay.

 

 

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Can Chemicals in Food Packaging Damage Children’s Teeth?

 

In recent years, there has been increased concern about the harmful effects of chemicals found in everyday products. Endocrine disruptors such as BPA are known to increase the risk of cancer, birth defects, and other conditions.

 

Now, research has linked these chemicals to MIH – a condition that irreversibly damages children’s teeth. The study found that early exposure to chemicals found in food packaging and fungicides may interfere with the growth of dental enamel.

 

Molar incisor hypermineralisation (MIH) is a condition that causes defects in a child’s tooth enamel. MIH weakens the enamel of permanent molars and incisors, causing the teeth to be cavity-prone and sensitive to hot and cold. The condition affects up to 18% of children aged six to nine.

 

Molar incisor hypermineralisation (MIH) is a condition that causes defects in a child’s tooth enamel. MIH weakens the enamel of permanent molars and incisors, causing the teeth to be cavity-prone and sensitive to hot and cold. The condition affects up to 18% of children aged six to nine.

 

To study the effects of endocrine disruptors on enamel, Dr. Katia Jedeon and his colleagues experimented on rats. They gave the rats daily doses of endocrine disruptors, in an amount equivalent to the average dose a human would experience daily. The exposure started in utero and continuing for a month after birth – the period when tooth enamel develops. 

 

After 30 days, they collected cells from the surface of the rats’ teeth and analyzed them. The chemicals had a clear effect. Two genes that control the creation of tooth enamel, Klk4 and SLC5A8, were expressed differently.

 

The study also revealed a potential cause of this effect.

 

In the second part of the experiment, the researchers collected ameloblast cells, which play a key role in forming tooth enamel. They found that sex hormones, like estrogen and testosterone, boost the expression of the genes that make tooth enamel. Endocrine disruptors can block the effect of male sex hormones. This indicates the chemicals may lead to MIH by blocking the hormones needed for development of tooth enamel.

 

Unlike bone, tooth enamel does not have living cells. This means it cannot regrow, so any damage to the enamel is permanent. However, parents can protect children by reducing their exposure to endocrine disruptors.

 

"Tooth enamel starts at the third trimester of pregnancy and ends at the age of 5, so minimizing exposure to endocrine disruptors at this stage in life as a precautionary measure would be one way of reducing the risk of enamel weakening,” says Dr. Jedeon. 

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5 Software Solutions for a Busy Dentist Office

 

Dentist Computer Software

 

Gone are the days when a sole practitioner could know clients by name and store their information in a single file cabinet. Most dental hygiene offices have many patients and sometimes multiple practitioners and hygienists.

 

However, even smaller practices have a duty to ensure the most accurate record keeping and efficient customer service possible.

 

Computer software solutions help to make that possible and there are a number of excellent packages designed specifically to meet the needs of the dental health community.

 

Here are five such software solutions especially good for use in a busy practice:

 

Curve Dental

 

One of the main concerns of any practice with mounds of data is computer reliability. What if your hard drive crashes and you don’t have a back-up of your patient data?

 

Cloud storage is an excellent remedy and Curve Dental allows practitioners to send digital images from an array of devices directly to the cloud. That way, if disaster should strike, you need not worry about the practice’s most important resource. Curve’s easy-to-use software also offers efficient options for charting, scheduling, credit card processing, billing, and online patient forms.

 

Ace Dental

 

Practice management can be overwhelming without the right program to keep everything organized and accessible. There are a number of options to choose from here, but Ace Dental offers more features than most of them. Fortunately, ease of use is one of this program’s strongest assets.

 

Patient records are a snap to retrieve, and the system provides other pertinent data with little more than a single mouse click per inquiry. Your appointment schedule also has all of the necessary treatment details included. This safeguards against confusion over who is appearing at what time, and what they require. Ace also makes the organization and sending of insurance claims simple, and that allows administrative staff to devote their shift time to other important duties.

 

Denticon

 

Denticon is another cloud-based option that offers excellent storage and retrieval options. It assists with both administrative and clinical treatment components, providing ample room for the inclusion of detailed patient treatment histories and insurance details.

 

In a nice touch, Denticon helps to revive a bit of the old-time service feel from days past. Practitioners can include personalized messages on patient statements that provide handy reminders of treatment methods or other important details discussed during appointments. It also incorporates a number of other useful features, and solid security ensures patient confidentiality.

 

Dentrix

 

Some dental procedures require patients to use medication for a period afterward. Keeping track of such information is tricky, but Dentrix streamlines things and makes the sending and tracing of prescriptions much easier.

 

The program also offers a flexible and efficient practice management system that will more than suffice for most office needs and patient rosters.

 

Carestream Dental

 

You would be hard-pressed to find a dental professional not in favor of making digital dental imaging and software more efficient and easy to use. Carestream Dental has risen to that challenge and succeeded by providing a system that meets these needs through greater speed and accuracy.

 

Carestream’s eConnections also helps to consolidate online marketing, appointment reminders, and patient solutions, allowing a practice to consolidate many different responsibilities into a single dashboard.  This makes marketing and return on investment decisions much easier to consider.

 

 

Once you have the software side of the business sorted out, don’t forget to address your dental hygiene gear. Using the latest and most effective equipment guarantees that you and your staff deliver the latest in oral health care.

 

Browse our latest catalog or contact our knowledgeable staff to learn more about how Sable Industries can help your practice continue to meet and exceed your patients’ expectations. 

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Best And Worst Foods For Your Teeth

When someone smiles, what is the first thing you look at? For many dental hygienists, and the public, it is the person’s teeth, particularly if they are brilliantly white or if there is something stuck in them. In addition to maintaining appearances, oral hygiene is essential to preventing gum disease, cavities, et cetera, which have a significant effect on oral health.

 

As you are aware, diet plays an important role in oral hygiene and health. While dental hygienists know the specifics behind which foods are good and bad for their teeth, many patients forget and require reminding. This is why we have compiled some of the information regarding two of the worst types of food for teeth as well as two of the best, including examples. Be sure to review this information with patients regularly. Their oral health will skyrocket if you do!

 

Sugary and Chewy Food

 

The sugar in food, especially refined sugar, is prime fodder for bad bacteria. The sugars often become acid, which is how cavities in your teeth get started. Some sugary drinks, such as pop, are your teeth’s worst enemy, particularly when it comes to eroding the enamel.

 

Worst Food for Teeth

 

Chewy food, on the other hand, is not good for your patient’s teeth because of how pieces are more likely to stick to them for longer. This makes eating gummy candy even worse for you, since the longer food sticks around in your mouth, the higher the potential for cavities becomes.

 

Be sure to remind patients of the effects of refined sugar and chewy food like gummy candy on their enamel and overall oral health. Of course, not everyone will be able to avoid them entirely. Thus, review best practices for oral hygiene, such as how to brush/floss and how often clients should floss) with each patient.

 

Acidic Food

 

As a dental hygienist, you are aware how highly acidic foods, such as lemons and pickles and drinks like alcohol and coffee, are among the worst for your teeth if you are not careful when consuming them. Remind patients about the effects beyond discolouration, which many are aware of. Put particular emphasis on sensitivity, cavities, and tooth decay. After all, stopping the issues as soon as possible helps prevent serious issues down the line.

 

Dairy Products

 

As a dental hygienist, you have likely told your patients drinking milk helps their teeth grow. Most people know the calcium helps make their bones strong, but many may not be aware the benefits go beyond that, particularly for their teeth. Inform patients about the mineral hydroxyapatite, of which calcium is a major part, since it helps to build up the strength of their enamel. This also goes for casein, a common protein found in dairy products such as cheese. Are your patients consuming food not so healthy for their teeth? Reminding them of the benefits of dairy, in addition to best oral hygiene practices, is a great way to counteract the effects.

 

Dairy Products - Teeth

 

High Fiber Food

 

Many individuals know high fiber food helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels and increases good digestion. But they may not be aware of what dental hygienists already know: the benefits they provide teeth. Review how the amount of chewing required to consume fiber-rich food increases the saliva in their mouth, which helps provide some natural cleaning. But make sure your patients do not forget to brush their teeth regularly too!

 

If your patient is stuck on what food they can consume with a high fiber content, popular suggestions include spinach and other leafy greens, beans, and whole wheat pasta.

 

Share your extensive oral health knowledge with your patients, and remind them of the effect both good and bad food has on their teeth!

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The Role of Dental Hygiene in Public Health

 

Think back to your days as a dental hygiene student. How did you picture your future career as a dental hygienist? If you dreamed of working in a fancy dental office with the latest and greatest in high-tech gadgets, you have something in common with hygienist Casandra Smith.

 

In an article for Hygienetown Magazine, Smith admits she was once a fresh dental hygiene student who hoped to spend her career as a dental hygienist within the confines of a comfortable office. But her outlook changed when she began seeing patients in her college’s clinic.

 

 

“During my time at the clinic, I treated many patients from underserved communities,” Smith writes. “They all came from different walks of life, but they had one common thread — limited access to care.”

 

Each of Smith’s patients had a story. All had tried and failed to receive dental treatment in the past. They faced obstacles like lack of insurance or transportation, disabilities, and language barriers. When these patients finally received treatment, they showered her with hugs, gratitude, and even a few tears of joy.

 

From that point on, Casandra Smith dedicated her career as a dental hygienist to the field of public health.

 

Role of Dental Hygiene in Public Health

 

Today, Casandra Smith works as a dental hygienist both in private practice and in a public health organization. She works with the Dental Sealant Program in Maricopa County, Arizona, travelling to elementary schools to place dental sealants on the teeth of students in need of care.

 

“Every school year, I see children with abscesses, rampant decay, and poor oral hygiene,” she writes. “Since most of these children have no dental insurance, I know that every dental sealant placed is very important.”

 

With an estimated 108 million Americans lacking insurance coverage for dental care, there is an urgent need for public health services in the United States. Public health organizations can help these people receive the hygiene treatment they need, and dental hygienists can make valuable contributions to the cause.

 

How Dental Hygienists Can Help

 

Casandra Smith wants dental hygienists to know being a clinician is not the only way to work in public health. “There are actually many ways a hygienist can overcome access-to-care issues and help the public receive hygiene treatment.”

 

For example, hygienists can create their own public health programs aimed at improving oral health in underserved areas. They can also advocate for change in public policy, and lobby for public health funding.

 

“No matter what role a dental hygienist plays in public health, it is a significant one,” Smith concludes. “Each role helps to grow public health, but when all the roles work together, the boundaries of public health can be transcended.”

 

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