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10 Tips for Oral Health Care

 

Tooth Care

 

You know the basics of oral health care: brush twice a day, floss your teeth, avoid sugary snacks, and visit your dentist at least twice a year. Here are 10 tips for oral health care you may not know (and a good refresher if you do!)

 

1) Brush Smarter

 

Which is better: a humble manual toothbrush or a fancy electric one? They can be equally effective, but what really matters is your brushing technique.

 

Don’t just brush up and down or back and forth. Hold the brush at a 45-degree angle and use a gentle, circular motion to clean each surface of the teeth, including the chewing side and the side facing your tongue, for at least two minutes. Brushing harder or faster doesn’t do you any good. In fact, it can actually lead to tooth and gum damage! 

 

2) Don't Forget to Floss

 

People often think flossing is secondary to brushing, but they are both essential to good oral health. If you aren’t flossing, you’re leaving a third of the surface of the teeth unclean.

 

The ideal flossing technique is a forward or backward motion, with the floss forming a curved ‘C’ shape around the tooth. Use a fresh part of the floss for each tooth so you aren’t re-inserting the bacteria you just removed.

 

3) Pay Attention to Sensitive Teeth

 

Sensitivity to heat and cold is a common dental complaint, and it’s often a sign of an underlying issue like tooth decay, gum disease, or tooth grinding. It’s important to find and treat the source of tooth sensitivity, even if the pain is mild. See your dentist at the first signs of sensitive teeth.

 

4) Eat Well and Brush Often

 

You’ve heard it since you were a kid: sugar causes cavities. True, a diet high in sugar can lead to cavities, but the real cause is plaque, produced by bacteria in your mouth that eats the carbohydrates left on teeth after a meal.

 

While sugar is the biggest cavity culprit, even healthy food leads to some plaque formation. This is why you should brush after every meal, not just after dessert, and avoid eating or drinking anything, aside from water, after you have brushed your teeth at night.

 

5) Watch Your Fillings

 

Do you have fillings? If so, you can usually expect them to last for eight to 10 years. However, some fillings break down earlier than that. When a filling starts to chip and break apart, food and bacteria can get caught underneath, causing decay deep in the tooth. Be sure to make a dental appointment if your tooth filling is not holding up.

 

6) Wear a Mouth Guard

 

Mouth guards are standard equipment for contact sports like hockey and football. However, less confrontational sports—such as baseball, skiing, and skateboarding—can also pose a risk of injury to your teeth. Even minor dental injuries can lead to long-term consequences, so a mouth guard is a good investment for anyone who participates in a sport on a regular basis.

 

7) Read the Ingredients on Toothpaste

 

What’s in your toothpaste? Different kinds of toothpaste—those for desensitizing, tartar control, whitening, et cetera—consist of different active ingredients. Understanding how these ingredients work will help you choose the right toothpaste for you. You should always choose a toothpaste containing fluoride, even if your tap water is already fluoridated. 

 

8) Beat Bad Breath

 

There are many possible causes of bad breath, but poor oral hygiene is a common source. When you don’t brush and floss regularly, odor-causing bacteria can accumulate between teeth and in the back of your throat. However, bad breath can also be a sign of a medical problem, so have a dentist rule out any oral hygiene issues first.

 

9) Use Mouthwash as Directed

 

Mouthwash cannot replace proper brushing and flossing, but it can help boost your oral hygiene and control issues like bad breath, plaque, and oral sores. Be sure to read the instructions on the bottle before using it. Depending on the ingredients, the manufacturer may recommend using it either before or after brushing or flossing for the best results.

 

10) Make Regular Dental Appointments

 

Do not wait until you have a problem to see your dentist! Even if your teeth and gums seem fine, the dentist might notice things you can’t feel or see. Scheduling regular dental exams will help you detect and treat cavities, tooth decay, gingivitis, and other oral health issues before they become painful and/or expensive to fix.

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Three Innovative Ways to Calm Your Patient

 

Some people find a trip to the dentist quite stressful. This can stem from anxiety, an unpleasant experience with another practitioner, or even a dental accident they saw in a movie or television show. Let’s face it—the thought of a stranger having access to an intimate part of the body can spook some individuals.

 

 

Many practitioners already take steps to offer the most relaxing and professional atmosphere possible to allay such fears. However, a recent study by Deva Priya Appukuttan offers additional suggestions on how to help clients struggling with dental phobia and a subsequent failure to maintain oral health through regular appointments.

 

Here are three of the main points the author discussed.

 

Get to Know Your Clients

 

When a practice first accepts clients, they answer a series of questions relating to their medical history, insurance, etc. Appukuttan suggests it is also wise to consider a semi-structured interview. This calm, informal conversation would allow the practitioner to learn more about situations causing fear and/or anxiety. The dentist or staff member could unobtrusively guide the conversation using open-ended questions, rather than direct and potentially off-putting queries.

 

In addition to learning what situations may cause issues, the dentist might also determine such fears are part of a wider psychological issue and recommend the person to seek out a therapist. This mental health professional may work directly with the dentist to design an approach to help the patient overcome their worries.

 

Anxiety Questionnaire

 

In addition to the medical questionnaire mentioned above, practitioners can also offer a second one dedicated to anxiety issues patients sometimes experience. This would act as a confidential way for nervous clients to self-report using a series of questions and a scale mirroring the person’s anxiety. For example, when asked about having a cavity filled, a “1” could mean little worry and a “5” could show great worry.

 

The dentist could use this knowledge to categorize patients and approach them accordingly. Starting a dialogue in this fashion can help avoid unexpected issues during the moments of a procedure where such an interruption could be problematic.

 

Building Trust

 

The rapport dental professionals build with their clients is very important. A busy practice often reduces the amount of time a practitioner can spend with patients, which is unfortunate, as it can lead to an increase in anxiety for some.

 

Taking the time to listen, answer questions, and map out each step in the procedure can go a long way in reducing a client’s fear. This opportunity to make inquiries and spell out any concerns will increase the person’s respect for the practitioner. It is important to acknowledge it is not unusual to experience some anxiety before a procedure. Make eye contact, avoid any negative word choices, and emphasize you are here to help. All questions are valid; provide detailed responses demonstrating your interest and desire to do a thorough and professional job.

 

Maintain this dialogue while performing the procedure. Keep the client informed of what you are doing and what the next step will be. Also, ask whether they are experiencing any discomfort and reassure them they are doing well. Be honest and straightforward.

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4 Behind The Scenes Tasks Dental Hygienists Do

 

When you visit your dentist’s office, you expect one of the dental hygienists to greet you in the waiting area and bring you to the exam room. It is customary for them to make conversation with you, floss your teeth, conduct a dental cleaning, and then call in the dentist.

 

Dental Hygienist

 

Dental hygienists spend a large portion of their workdays in front of patients, primarily cleaning, polishing, and scaling the patient’s teeth. Most people, if asked what dental hygienists do all day, will likely give that as a response. However, there are also some tasks they perform either completely behind the scenes or some that patients simply do not notice during their appointment. Keep reading for the reveal of the four most significant behind the scenes tasks dental hygienists perform during their daily duties.

 

Checking Facial Expressions

 

When the dentist is checking your teeth, they are wearing what is essentially a powerful magnifying glass on their eyes. This allows them to really look closely at your teeth and determine things such as cavities, signs of gum disease, et cetera. However, it also prevents them from really seeing your face and facial expressions, which makes them blind to any winces and other signs of discomfort. In many instances, the dental hygienists often observe the patient’s facial expressions in order to determine if everything is going well. Patients are often too preoccupied to notice dental hygienists commonly do this.

 

Stocking the Office

 

Every dental office needs a vast array of supplies, including surgical masks, protective gloves, glasses, and the tools used to perform cleanings, suction, et cetera. How do all these supplies and equipment stay in the required quantities at the dental office? This duty often falls to dental hygienists, who stock up the exam rooms and office as a whole when they are not working directly with a patient.

 

Cleaning the Exam Room

 

It is necessary to clean exam rooms and sanitize all the tools before a new patient enters for their dental appointment. After all, a dental office is a medical environment. So who cleans the exam rooms in between patients? This is where the dental hygienists come in. In many instances, they have their own exam room for patients, which they will clean and sanitize before bringing another patient back. This usually includes cleaning the chair and the glasses used, plus disinfecting the dental tools (or replacing them with new ones while they undergo additional cleaning).

 

Reviewing History and Charts

 

Your primary doctor will often rely on your medical record, which includes notes from past appointments as well as details on any vaccinations you may have received. Your tooth records are just as important to a dentist. In fact, you may actually need to provide information from your overall medical history to the dentist and dental hygienist. Such information can include any medication you might be taking, surgeries you have had, allergies, et cetera. The task of reviewing and updating patient history and charts, including ensuring updated x-rays are in the file, almost always falls to the dental hygienists.

 

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