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The Importance of Pet Dental Care

Your pet’s oral health is important. Although it might not be something you think about often, dental care is a critical part of maintaining your cat or dog’s overall health.

 

Bacteria and plaque can harden on your pet’s teeth and form tartar. This can lead to gingivitis, receding gums, pain and tooth loss. Dental problems not only affect your pet’s teeth and oral health but can easily spread to other vital organs such as the heart and kidneys.

 

 

Recognizing the importance of pet dental care is an important step in giving them long, healthy lives.

 

Dental Care Helps to Avoid Pain

Annual oral examinations, dental X-rays and cleanings ensure that your pet’s dental health is in check. Oral pain can be frustrating for your pet and is often expensive to treat. Avoid this unnecessary problem by keeping a close eye on your pet’s dental health and incorporating your dental vet’s recommendations into your regular caring routine.

 

Preventative Care Avoids Added Expenses

Dental procedures can be expensive. That’s why it’s vital that you monitor your pet’s oral health frequently. Although basic treatments are usually included on a pet insurance plan, larger procedures are not. These treatments and surgeries range anywhere from a couple hundred to thousands of dollars. That’s why you must take care of things before they get serious.

 

Tooth Brushing is Important for Pets, Too

Like humans, pets need a dental routine in place. Although brushing your pet’s teeth is not as easy as brushing your own, it’s crucial for overall oral health.

 

Regular brushing is the first step in preventing tartar build-up and gum disease. Use a toothbrush and pet toothpaste. You can also use a finger brush or wrap gauze around your finger. If the process of brushing teeth is introduced gently and gradually, pets will usually tolerate cleaning.

 

Brush your pets’ teeth at least a few times a week. This will help maintain healthy teeth and gums. Pets can become agitated, so make sure they’re feeling calm or tired.

 

Recognize the Signs of Oral Disease

Check your pet’s mouth a few times a month to ensure their oral health is in check. Make sure gums are pink, not white or red, and teeth are clean without signs of brown tartar. Vomiting, loss of appetite, excessive drinking or urinating and bad breath are also signs of dental disease.

 

Other Techniques to Maintain Oral Health

There are many products that promote dental health in pets including textured toys, teeth-cleaning kibble and gels. However, your pet’s diet must contain at least 75% dental food for it to be effective. Look for products approved by the Veterinary Oral Health Council, and never use human tooth pastes with your pet.

 

Of course, having your pet’s teeth checked and cleaned by a professional is the best way to monitor their oral health and ensure they’re getting the best care possible.

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It’s Time to End These 6 Persistent Veterinary Dental Myths

Veterinary dentists and pet owners alike want what is best for their animals. Unfortunately, the subject of pet dental care is plagued with harmful misconceptions.

 

 

Is “dog breath” normal? Should dogs chew bones? Is it safe for groomers to use dental equipment? These are among the persistent veterinary dental myths we want to address in this article.

 

1. Bad Breath Is Normal in Dogs

Myth: Even healthy pups can have foul-smelling “dog breath”; it’s just one of those things that come with owning a dog.

 

Fact: In dogs and other pets, halitosis is a clear sign of gingivitis or oral infection.

 

The idea that “dog breath” is normal is a common misconception. The truth is that dogs with halitosis almost always suffer from significant to severe periodontal disease.  

 

Halitosis occurs when anaerobic bacteria in the mouth certain amino acids. Although it can result from gingivitis alone, oral infection is by far the most common cause.

 

Chronic bad breath is a clear sign that a pet needs veterinary attention.

 

2. It is Safe for Dogs to Chew Bones

Myth: A canine’s powerful teeth and jaws are built to chew through hard materials like bone.

 

Fact: Chewing bones poses numerous health hazards to dogs.

 

Much as dogs love to gnaw on a good bone, it’s not necessarily good for them. While it’s true that dogs benefit from having something to chomp on, there are many reasons why hard materials like bone, antlers and chicken’s feet are not a safe choice:

  • A dog’s teeth are susceptible to fractures, which are immensely painful and may require surgical treatment.
  • Bones and other firm materials can splinter into sharp pieces, causing gum or tongue lacerations, or becoming embedded under the gum line.
  • Bones are a serious choking hazard.
  • Since bones are not digestible, they can cause stomach and intestinal problems if swallowed.

Dr. Fraser Hale, a veterinary dental specialist, recommends owners use the “kneecap rule” to decide whether a toy is suitable for a dog. The rule goes like this: if you wouldn’t want someone to hit you in the kneecap with it, your dog shouldn’t be chewing on it. 
 

3. Dental Chews and Dental Formula Food Will Improve a Pet’s Oral Health

Myth: Using products marketed as ‘dental chews’ or ‘dental formula food’ can help improve an animal’s teeth and gums.

Fact: Not all pet dental products are effective.

It isn’t difficult to find chew toys, treats, and pet food that carriers the ‘dentist-approved’ label. Well-meaning pet owners collectively spend millions of dollars on these products each year.

However, not all ‘dental formulas’ are beneficial for an animal’s teeth (not more than the average bag of kibble, at least.)

Veterinary dental specialists recommend that pet owners look for the Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) seal of approval before purchasing a product that purports to promote good oral health. The Council’s work is approved by the American Veterinary Dental College.

 

4. Dental Scaling by a Groomer Can Prevent Oral Health Issues

Myth: Dental scaling services offered by pet groomers are a good way to keep a pet’s teeth clean and healthy.

 

Fact: Non-professional dental scaling is cosmetic only and does not prevent or treat oral disease.

 

It is illegal in many places for pet groomers to offer non-professional dental scaling (NPDS). However, in some regions, the myth persists that this service can help pets stay healthy.

 

Dental scaling involves using dental equipment to scrape debris from the surface of an animal’s teeth. Some groomers purchase these tools and offer scaling services to clients at a lower cost than a professional dental cleaning performed by a vet.

 

Unfortunately, this non-professional dental scaling is merely cosmetic. Groomers lack the knowledge to identify oral health treatments, nor the ability to prescribe treatment. Without anaesthetic, they cannot remove disease-causing bacteria below the gumline.

 

Veterinary dental specialists recommend pet owners avoid these services, as they do nothing improve oral health.

 

5. You Can Judge A Pet’s Oral Health by Its Appetite

Myth: If an animal is still eating, it must not have dental issues.

 

Fact: Many pets will eat despite severe oral pain.

 

It’s true: loss of appetite and difficulty chewing are tell-tale signs of periodontal disease. However, these are far from the only signs, and many dogs, cats and other pets will not stop eating just because they’re in pain.

 

When an animal is in pain, they will often instinctively try to conceal it. It’s typical for an animal with serious oral health issues to clean their bowl as usual.

 

This is one reason why it’s important for owners to stay vigilant about their pet’s oral health and be aware of other warning signs, such as:

  • Red or bleeding gums
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Loose or missing teeth
  • Facial swelling
  • Nasal discharge
  • Gum recession

Pet owners should also take steps to prevent these issues at home; which leads to the final veterinary dental myth that must be quashed.

 

6. Dogs Don’t Need to Have Their Teeth Brushed

Myth: Dogs clean their teeth naturally by gnawing on bones and chew toys, so they don’t need to have their teeth brushed.

 

Fact: Daily brushing is the best way to prevent oral health issues in dogs.

 

By the age of 3, over 85% of dogs have some degree of periodontal disease.

 

It begins when bacteria form plaque on the teeth, gradually working their way under the gums. Over time, oral bacteria damage the supportive tissue around the teeth. In serious cases, periodontal disease can destroy the gum, bone and ligaments holding teeth in place and even infect the bloodstream.

 

Fortunately, there is a simple way to deter this prevalent problem: regular brushing.

 

As demonstrated by this video, the process is no different from how we humans brush. Dog toothpaste is available in appealing flavours like chicken and seafood. Eventually, the routine can become as natural as brushing our own teeth.

 

Vets and veterinary dentists should encourage this practice among every owner they advise.

 

Dental Equipment and Supplies for Veterinary Specialists

Sable Industries is a premiere supplier of quality dental handpiece parts, dental equipment, and other dental supplies. We strive to provide the best tools of the trade to dentists, registered dental hygienists, and veterinary dental specialists across North America.

 

Contact us to inquire about our solutions for veterinary dental specialists.

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Do Dental X-Rays Cause Thyroid Cancer? How to Ease Patient Concerns About Dental X-Rays

Dental x-rays are an important diagnostic tool. They reveal oral health issues that could otherwise go unnoticed: areas of decay, bone loss, abscesses, tumours, and conditions of the root canal. Unfortunately, some people are wary of dental x-rays, dental practitioners aren’t always sure how to ease their concerns.

 

 

These tips can help you educate patients on the significant benefits and minimal risks associated with dental x-rays so they can make a well-informed decision about their care.

 

Do Dental X-Rays Cause Thyroid Cancer?

If you’ve worked as a dentist or dental hygienist in the last few years, you’ve probably heard it before:

 

Are dental x-rays safe? Can they cause thyroid cancer?

 

According to an article in Today’s RDH, much of the fear surrounding dental x-rays originates from a talk show several years ago. The show presented a link between the radiation from dental x-rays and thyroid cancer. Video clips shared widely through email and social media sites, sparking an increase in patients refusing x-rays out of concern for their health.

 

In truth, the link between dental x-rays and thyroid cancer is tenuous, and the show failed to explain how dental x-rays compares to other radiation sources (a dental x-ray is about 0.005 mSv of radiation, equalling less than one day of background radiation exposure.)

 

Regardless, this trend is a challenge to dental practitioners. The public is not well-informed about radiation, and not all practitioners are prepared to address their concerns. The absence of x-ray images can make it difficult to effectively diagnose and treat patients.

 

However, with the right approach and a bit of patience, many dentists and dental hygienists can help patients understand that dental x-rays are safe.

 

1. Have Empathy

For many patients, visiting the dentist is unpleasant to begin with. The added uncertainty surrounding radiation can make the experience more frightening.

 

Your patience and empathy can make a world of difference in this circumstance. As always, it’s crucial to communicate openly with the patient and take time to explain things in a way they understand.

 

2. Respect Different Backgrounds and Beliefs

Understand that dental x-rays are not common everywhere in the world. Newcomers, along with older adults who have little experience with the dentist, may not be familiar with dental x-rays.

 

Acknowledge that you may have to take a different approach with patients of differing cultural backgrounds. It may help to have an interpreter explain the process to them.

 

3. Explain the Precautions Taken

Take time to assure your patients that you and your staff take measures to ensure that dental x-rays are as safe as possible. Explain the purpose of a lead apron, lead thyroid collar, and the ALARA principle for radiation exposure.

 

4. Compare Dental X-Rays to Other Radiation Sources

A 2017 study examined different approaches to informing patients about radiation exposure from x-rays and other imaging tests. According to this research, patients prefer to receive the information in both oral and written formals, along with a table showing how radiation exposure from the test compares to background radiation.

 

The average American receives about 620 mrem of radiation each year, half of which comes from natural background radiation. The radiation ‘dosage’ associated with dental x-rays is just 0.005 mSv, less than a single day’s worth of background exposure.

 

Making this comparison can help patients understand that dental x-rays are not something to fear. However, the information should be delivered with empathy and not to belittle the patient’s concerns.

 

More Resources for Dentists and Dental Hygienists

Sable Industries is a trusted provider of quality dental equipment and supplies to practitioners across North America. Check out our oral health blog for more dental news and resources.

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Why Dental Hygienists Should Perform Extraoral Head and Neck Examinations

Caries. Gingivitis. Ulcerations. Bruxism. These are among the common ailments dental hygienists watch for in every routine dental examination. But there are some areas of inspection many hygienists overlook: namely, the oral structures of the head and neck.

 

Dental professionals, including hygienists, omit conducting an extraoral head and neck examination on patients on a routine basis. However, head and neck examinations can save lives, as they are key to identifying signs of oral cancer.

 

Importance of Extraoral Head and Neck Examinations

When oral cancer is detected and treated in its early stages, the 5-year survival rate is as high as 90%. However, because it often develops without pain or symptoms, patients rarely notice the disease until it has progressed into Stage 2 or beyond.

 

For this reason, dental hygienists and other professionals can greatly improve patient outcomes, or even save lives, by incorporating head and neck examinations as part of routine dental examinations.

 

Dental professionals conduct extraoral head and neck examinations by palpating important structures of the patient’s head and neck to assess and identify abnormal conditions. A thorough examination involves palpation of the jaw joints, parotid salivary glands, thyroid gland, masseter muscles, and various lymph nodes (submental, submandibular, cervical, supraclavicular, occipital, postauricular, and preauricular lymph nodes).

 

It is not necessary to perform these checks in any exact sequence, but the clinician should choose a sequence and apply it consistently to maintain awareness of abnormal versus normal conditions.

A well-practised clinician can complete this examination within four to five minutes.

 

How Dental Hygienists Can Perform Head and Neck Examinations to Improve Patient Outcomes

Unfortunately, many dental hygienists do not conduct thorough  head and neck examinations on patients.

 

The Canadian Dental Hygienists Association (CDHA) identifies various barriers that stand in the way: lack of time, insufficient training or knowledge, concern about client compliance, and lack of guidelines and tools.

 

But the capacity of these exams to improve outcomes for patients is too great to ignore. Dental professionals can potentially detect up to 84% of new oral cancer cases in the critical early stages. And, as demonstrated by an anecdote told by TGNA Clinical Coach and guest columnist Karina Bapoo-Mohamed, these 5-minute examinations can save lives.

 

Bapoo-Mohamed advised her patient to see a doctor ‘sooner than later’ after discovering an abnormality. Within days, the patient was referred for treatment for stage 1 oral cancer.

 

“Everyone that asks how/why I had it checked,” writes the patient, “and all I say is thanks to my Dental Hygienist.”

 

The CDHA sets out the following steps dental hygienists can take to improve their practice when it comes to extraoral head and neck examinations:

  1. Know the facts on oral cancer. Dental hygienists should be confident in their knowledge and ability to locate, review, and update baseline data.
  2. Know the early signs to look for. Perform extraoral head and neck examinations in addition to other routine dental exams. Use this fact sheet from Canadian Dental Association as a starting point for educating yourself on the signs of oral cancer.
  3. Effectively communicate findings to patients. Ensure that patients understand the urgency of identifying and treating a potential case of oral cancer in the early stages.
  4. Refer patients appropriately. Dentists and dental hygienists should establish a process for referring patients who could have oral cancer to a doctor who can conduct a biopsy.
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Airway Support in Dentistry

Medicine has long recognized the connection between a patient’s oral health and general health. While research on the precise mechanisms of this oral-system link is ongoing, we know that inflammation by oral bacterial contributes to inflammation in other parts of the body. In a recent piece for Hygienetown, RDH Shirley Gutkowski discusses an aspect of the oral-systemic link that is proving to be more significant than previously thought: airway disorders.

 

orofacial myology

 

Complications of the airway, particularly mouth breathing and sleep apnea, are growing concerns among dental professionals. Below, we’ll examine how dentists and dental hygienists can use airway support in dentistry to help patients improve their oral and overall health.

 

How Airway Disorders Affect the Oral-Systemic Link

In her article, Gutkowski contextualizes the issues through the work of pediatric dentist Dr. Kevin Boyd. Dr. Boyd is a leading scholar in Darwinian Dentistry, a medical theory exploring the link between modern systemic diseases and human evolutionary changes.

 

Darwinian Dentistry hypothesizes that the rapid industrialization of food has spurred evolutionary changes that leave us susceptible to airway disorders. Specifically, humans have smaller midfaces and smaller sinus cavities than our ancestors, contributing to mouth breathing while awake and apnea during sleep.

 

Mouth breathing causes numerous oral health issues: lower oral pH, dry gum tissue, malocclusion. But it has also been linked to systemic issues far beyond the oral cavity, including higher incidences of ADHD and learning disabilities in children.

 

The same is true about sleep apnea. Gutkowski points out the conditions associated with inflammation are nearly identical to those linked with sleep apnea, and many studies show an increase in inflammation in people who snore. In one study, seniors with abnormal pulmonary function had significantly higher incidences of gingivitis.

 

Airway Support in Dentistry

An increasing number of dental professionals are focusing on the airway, some even opening “sleep practices” that specialize in these disorders. Many of these dentists can provide patients with dental appliances designed to support the jaw during sleep, providing airway support to alleviate apnea symptoms.

 

The practice of Orofacial myofunctional therapy (OMT) is also gaining acceptance as an alternative method of treating airway disorders. OMT involves movements that strengthen the muscles involved in the airway complex. The results are impressive: OMT has been demonstrated to reduce apnea by 62% in children and 50% in adults.

 

There are several ways dental hygienists can play a role in airway support. It is likely that demand for these skills will increase as recognition of airway disorders in the oral-systemic link continues to grow among dental professionals.

  1. Become an expert. Registered dental hygienists can apply for certification as an Orofacial Myologist following completion of an IAOM-approved 28-hour course.
  2. Be breath-aware. Along with looking for signs of periodontal inflammation, hygienists can observe a patient’s breathing for potential issues. A patient who cannot breathe through the nose for 20 or more respiration cycles should receive a referral to an orofacial myology specialist.
  3. Practice preventative treatments. Since OMT takes time, hygienists can provide patients with fluoride varnishes in the meantime, which can help to prevent oral health issues associated with apnea and mouth breathing issues.
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Can Dental Problems Trigger Migraines?

Migraine symptoms have many potential triggers: bright light, changes in air pressure, allergies, high humidity, stress, and more. Can dental problems trigger migraines as well?

Dental problems can trigger migraine

 

According to the American Migraine Association, migraines affect over a billion people worldwide. Over 36 million people experience migraines in the United States alone.

 

What many people do not realize is that their migraine symptoms could be relieved by treating common dental problems.

 

An article in Dentistry Today explores the link between migraines and dental issues. Some of the dental problems that can trigger migraines include:

  • Loose teeth
  • Misalignment
  • Missing teeth
  • Bruxism (tooth grinding)
  • Clenching teeth
  • Caries (tooth decay)
  • Periodontitis (gum disease)

 

How Bad Bite Causes Migraines

Loose, missing, or misaligned teeth contribute to a bad bite. Bad bite strains the jaw muscles by forcing them to work harder to chew, swallow, and even keep the mouth shut. Over time, bad bite contributes to persistent muscle inflammation that can trigger painful migraines or headaches.

 

Pain that begins in the temporomandibular joints, which connect the sides of the jaw to the skull, can also lead to migraines and headaches.

 

Migraines often develop on one side of the head, beginning around the temple and spreading to the back of the head. Dentists observe that patients who complain of having frequent “one-sided” headaches are more likely to have dental problems relating to a bad bite.

 

Tooth Grinding and Migraines

Bruxism, or tooth grinding, is another common dental problem that can trigger migraines. Many people who experience tooth grinding do so at night, so they do not realize they have a dental problem, but do report persistent headaches or migraines.

Other signs of tooth grinding include:

  • Clicking sound when opening the mouth
  • Tender teeth
  • Difficulty opening and closing the mouth
  • Tongue indentations

Clenching or gnashing teeth causes inflammation in the gums and jaw muscles. As with bad bite, the inflammation caused by clenching or gnashing is a potential migraine trigger. These migraines often feel like a dull, constant headache originating around the temples behind the eyes.

 

Migraines, Tooth Decay and Gum Disease

Gum disease is linked to a number of health issues, including migraines. Periodontitis can “refer” pain to the head, which causes sufferers to feel they are suffering from headaches.

 

Throbbing toothaches caused by tooth decay can also trigger headaches or migraine episodes.

 

Are Dental Problems Causing My Migraines?

There is a strong connection between headaches, migraines and untreated dental problems. Fortunately, there are usually ways to treat the underlying issue and diminish the migraine symptoms.

 

Dentists can correct many of the dental problems that trigger migraines through simple dental procedures, orthodontic treatment, or a mouthguard. In addition to relief from migraine pain, patients will experience the benefits of better oral health.

 

While there is no guarantee that treating the problem will end the migraines, dentists can help determine whether the symptoms and dental problems are linked. It is always worth asking.

 

Patients who experience symptoms of bad bite, tooth grinding, tooth decay, or gum disease should see a dentist regularly and ask about headaches and migraines.

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10 Ways Being Confident Can Boost Patient Satisfaction

There are many ways to boost patient satisfaction in your dental practice. Clear communication, good time management, friendliness, efficiency, and empathy are significant factors in a patient’s overall expectations of their dental experience.  

 

10 Ways Being Confident Can Boost Patient Satisfaction

 

But according to the Canadian Dental Association, one quality stands out above the rest: confidence.  

 

A dental practitioner’s confidence, and the ways in which they demonstrate it, ranks as the #1 influencer on how patients perceive their quality of care, according to the latest Canadian Dental Association survey. 

 

Why? Confident people attract positive attention — no secret there. It’s natural to be attracted to people with high self-esteem, whose confidence shines through their charisma, appearance, speaking, writing, and listening skills. Confidence is a sign of competence, not arrogance, in the dental practice. 

 

To promote and maintain patient satisfaction, professional dental care providers need to keep confidence at an optimum level to ensure ongoing quality of care. Below, we’ll discuss some of the ways to grow and maintain that confidence in your practice. 

 

Ways to Be Confident and Boost Patient Satisfaction 

 

A person’s levels of confidence can swing up and down due to positive or negative experiences, and criticisms. We are most confident when we are performing routine and familiar tasks.

 

Here are ways to show your confidence as a dental practitioner or hygienist: 

 

  1. Be optimistic. Think positively. While it may sound cliché, there are tangible and proven benefits to adopting an air of optimism, and your positive outlook will rub off on your patients. 
  2. Focus on the present. What do you want to accomplish today? Don’t dwell on the past. Once you have acknowledged your mistakes, learn to accept them and move forward. 
  3. Accept compliments graciously. Say thank you. What may seem like minor work to you can have a profoundly positive impact on your patients’ lives, so you should always be open to their praises. 
  4. Face your fears. When you have a busy day ahead, tackle the tasks you like least first. You will face the remainder with the confidence of knowing the worst is over. 
  5. Break down large tasks into smaller sub-tasks. Knowing how to prioritize your to-dos is key to ensuring you accomplish your daily goals. 
  6. Learn and research new skills and technology. The world of dentistry is continuously advancing, and being prepared will help you keep a competitive edge. 
  7. Recognize your strengths and achievements. You have come a long way to get where you are. Remember to celebrate successes. 
  8. Manage stress. Don’t let your own wellness get lost in the daily grind. Develop effective coping strategies, and take moments to just breathe throughout your day. 
  9. Smile. Learn to laugh at yourself. Take pleasure in your daily tasks. 
  10. Believe in yourself and your team. Positive reinforcement will help everyone in the practice grow their confidence and boost patient satisfaction. 

Image: wavebreakmediamicro

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Opioids and Dentistry: What Dentists Can Do In The Face of An Opioid Crisis

The North American opioid crisis is not only an issue for public health and law enforcement officials; it also concerns dentists and dental hygienists in private practice. In fact, dentists can play a significant role in protecting their patients from succumbing to addiction and substance abuse.

 

Opioids and Dentistry -  What Dentists Can Do In The Face of An Opioid Crisis

 

As medical professionals who prescribe opioid drugs to patients, it is imperative for dentists to understand the link between opioids and dentistry, and the steps they can take to help combat the opioid crisis.

 

Opioids and Dentistry

Despite great advancements in dental techniques and technology, pain is often a necessary consequence of performing dental work. Fortunately, we have also come a long way in developing effective steps to lessen patients’ discomfort, and pain management is a top priority of any dental practice.

 

Among the pain management tools at a dentist’s disposal are analgesics (painkillers) and other prescription drugs. In many cases, drugs like acetaminophen and anti-inflammatories are sufficient in managing a patient’s dental pain. However, there are cases where non-opioid drugs are not enough, and that is when dentists might consider prescribing an opioid analgesic like codeine or oxycodone.

 

All drugs carry risks, but opioids are more liable to misuse than most, and opioid abuse can result in grievous harm. In 2016, over 42,000 peopled died from overdosing on opioid drugs in the United States alone. Many people who use narcotics first developed a dependency to legally-prescribed analgesics.

 

It’s not to say that dentists are unaccustomed to making judgement calls; exercising professional judgement is a part of what dentists and other healthcare professionals do every day. However, with opioid abuse causing a record-number of overdose deaths in Canada and the U.S., dentists must be especially careful in weighing the potential benefits and risks of prescribing these drugs to a patient.

 

What Dentists Can Do

The American Dental Association has made a commitment to help put an end to opioid abuse, urging dentists to educate themselves on the issue and follow the opioid prescribing guidelines set out by the Centers for Disease Control.

 

In a message to America’s dentists, ADA president Joseph Crowley asks dentists to take four specific steps to prevent opioid analgesics from harming patients:

 

1.     Consider using non-narcotic pain relievers as the first line of treatment.

2.     When prescribing an opioid pain reliever, consider prescribing fewer pills in accordance with state law and the latest pain management guidelines.

3.     Counsel patients about the benefits and drawbacks of using opioids to relieve pain, especially the risk of addiction.

4.     Learn to recognize when a patient might have a substance use disorder or be more prone than others to addiction.

 

The ADA also provides a free continuing education course on how to incorporate safe and effective protocols for using opioids to manage dental pain and offers a reference manual on how to manage dental pain for patients who are at risk of substance abuse.

 

Image: kzenon
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NEW Expanded List of Electric Parts Available

Important New Product Introduction Announcement:

 

 

Dear Valued Customers,

 

It is with great enthusiasm that Sable Industries announces the introduction of our expanded Electric Parts series of products.

 

Sable now offers more key electric parts in order to help you keep repairs in house and at a great value.  We have integral parts for Bein Air, Kavo and NSK electric handpieces. 

 

Sable electric parts are compatible with leading electric handpieces which will allow you to:

  • Keep more repairs in house as opposed to sending back to OEM
  • Purchase only the key assemblies that require replacement
  • Contain costs for yourself and your clients

Sable is the North American leader in handpiece parts.  It is our pleasure to expand our offerings into electric parts to bring our expertise and outstanding service to this under-served yet growing segment of your business.  We will be adding more electric parts from other OEM manufacturers in the near future.

 

Please note that our Cartridge and Assembled products are warrantied for manufacturer defect for 1 year, all individual parts are not warrantied.

 

To order or to learn more please call us at 1.800.368.8106

 

Regards,

 

Riley T. Nick

Sales & Marketing Manager

Sable Industries Inc.

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Is Your Dental Practice Using Too Many Chemicals?

With more and more people making an effort to be informed on the chemicals and materials they’re exposed to every day, many dentists are looking to reduce the number of chemicals used in their practices.

Cutting down on chemicals dental practice

 

Proper cleaning and disinfection in a dental office is a legitimate concern. After all, if disinfection isn’t done properly, a patient could be harmed. Everyone in the practice is responsible for ensuring the safety of all patients that walk through its doors.

 

The best way to avoid making a patient sick is to make sure that any sources of infection are properly contained. Unfortunately, it’s all too common to hear that evacuation systems aren’t cleaned daily—or aren’t properly disinfected when they are cleaned.

 

Reasons for the lapse in cleanliness could partly be due to the work involved, but also the perceived dangers of the continuous use of chemicals every time the system is cleaned. Over the past three decades, newer and stronger chemicals have been introduced to keep surfaces, water lines, and evacuation systems clean and sterile. However, the number of chemicals can also create issues, and many are harmful on their own.

 

The alternative is microbiological cleaners. But what are they, and how do they work?

 

Microbiology

 

It was over 150 years ago that doctors figured out washing their hands before surgery drastically reduced the patient’s risk of infection. This jumpstarted the field of microbiology, or the study of microscopic organisms.

 

Once we started looking, we discovered bacteria everywhere.

 

It’s estimated that there are more bacterial cells in a human body than there are cells that make up that whole person. The sheer number of microbial organisms that constantly surround us is staggering, which is why it’s so hard to create sterile environments. We need to use intense stressors like temperature, pressure, or chemicals to eliminate microbial growth.

 

We simply must accept that we are, and always will be, swimming in a sea of bacteria. The good news is, though, that the clear majority of bacteria won’t make you sick. Most bacteria really do not affect us. In fact, there are plenty of microbes that actually keep us healthy. Your gut, for example, is chock full of bacteria that is helping you to remain healthy and digest your food.

 

The good bacteria in your gut also keeps dangerous, harmful bacteria at bay. It’s this same principle that makes microbial disinfection such a good alternative.

 

Microbial Disinfection

 

As an alternative to chemicals, disinfection can be done using microbial cleaning products. These products seed and jumpstart the growth of “good bugs.”

 

These good bugs not only help to kill harmful ones, but they also work to keep the bad bugs away. This is one clear advantage to chemical sterilization—the harmful bacteria is kept at bay for longer.

 

Products like Bio-Pure can keep an evacuation system clean of harmful bacteria on a continuous basis. It does this by introducing a cleaning microbe into the system. Microbial growth is exponential, which means one microbe can quickly become 10,000,000. This army of good bacteria cleans out all other microbes and creates a barrier against bad bugs.

 

Short of cleaning out the system before and after each use, Bio-Pure is the most effective way to keep a system clean and safe at all times. Plus, there’s no need for harmful chemicals.

 

Click here if you want to learn more about Bio-Pure and whether it’s a good fit for your practice!

 

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