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How to Ask for a Raise as a Dental Hygienist

 

You know it just as well as I ‒ dental hygienists provide pivotal, foundational services that keep a dental practice thriving. We work hard every day to make a difference in the lives of our patients and work functionally alongside dentists and other dental professionals.

 

In some ways, you could say that we’re the face of the dental field.

 

So, do we deserve a raise?

 

Yes!

 

Not sure where to start or how to approach your boss about asking for a pay raise? Below, I’ve listed a few suggestions that I’ve picked up over the years from other veteran hygienists. All of these will help you to put your best foot forward when it’s time to have that all-important conversation!

 

1. Understand Your Contributions

Blindly asking for a raise won’t get you far, but conducting a thorough “self-review” before requesting a meeting with your boss will help you build a foundation for a powerful argument.

 

As hygienists, we spend our days caring for each of our patients while assuaging their fears, guiding them toward better oral health, and ensuring that their experience in the dental chair is a positive one. With all this in mind, it’s easy to forget that our practices are businesses, too!

 

Examine how you contribute to the overall functioning of the practice as a business, and use these facts to defend your request for a pay raise.

 

2. Back Yourself Up

Never underestimate the power of backing up your request with the facts.

 

Document your increase in production, list the ways that you’ve improved your place of employment, include patient reviews that you’ve collected during your self-review, and let your boss know whether you’re responsible for an increase in returning patients.

 

Provide numbers whenever possible. There's no denying concrete data!

 

3. Consider the Timing

When scheduling your meeting, avoid late afternoon or after-work hours.

 

At the end of the day, both you and your boss are likely to be tired (and maybe even a tad cranky). Not only does this mean you won’t perform at your best, but your request may more easily be shrugged off or flat-out denied. Instead, try for a lunch meeting.

 

Also, consider aligning this conversation with annual reviews or your anniversary as an employee, but don’t ask for a raise if your office has just invested in some new, expensive equipment! If this is the case, wait a bit.

 

4. Have Some Numbers in Mind

Your boss is likely to be more responsive to your request for a raise if you’ve already considered the increase you’re looking for.

 

Don’t put them in a difficult spot by requesting a raise and leaving the numbers completely up to them. Instead, requesting a specific increase will not only move the process along more smoothly but also open the door for further discussion and negotiation.

 

Balance is key here. By asking for too much, you risk appearing self-important and unprofessionally unrealistic. However, don’t ask for so little that you’re not fighting for what you deserve!

 

It may be helpful to use your increase in production as a guide.

 

5. Be Thankful

There’s a lot to be said for an attitude that’s balanced with both confidence and humility.

 

While it’s important to assert your self-worth, dedicate part of your meeting to emphasize how grateful you are for the opportunities you’ve received as part of the practice. Let your boss know that you’re always looking for ways to give back and make the office a better place.

 

You’re asking for the practice to value you, so be sure that you value the practice right back!

 

6. Prepare for Possible Outcomes

In a perfect world, your conscientious request for a raise would be honoured without question.

 

In reality, however, the results of your meeting may not be so simple. Regardless of whether or not you deserve a raise and regardless of how thoroughly you’ve proved your worth to your boss, your request may be declined simply because the office is financially unable to honour your request. This does not mean that your boss doesn’t value your contributions!

 

If you’re denied a raise, you may consider negotiating some non-financial benefits such as equipment upgrades, commute reimbursement, or vacation pay.

 

Above all, remain professional throughout this process; no matter the outcome, take pride in yourself and in your work. If at first you don’t succeed, wait several months and try again!

 

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